Classes

Group classes and private lessons

Wushu/Kung Fu

Classes are offered for all ability levels.  Classes are taught in the late afternoons and evenings as well as during the day on Saturdays. Please see our schedule for details. Martial arts basics such as flexibility, strength, speed, power, and spirit are emphasized in our traditional kung fu and contemporary wushu classes.


Description: Students.jpgKung Fu curriculum includes but is not limited to the
following routines:
  • Shaolin lian huan quan (Shaolin linking form)
  • Shaolin xiao hong quan
  • Shaolin qi xing quan (Shaolin Seven-star form)
  • Basic shaolin broadsword
  • Shaolin yan shou gun (Shaolin covering  hand staff)
For details about kung fu please check wikipedia at:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kung_fu

 



Description: photo.JPGWushu curriculum includes but is not limited to the
following routines:
  • Five stance forms
  • 3 duan routines including all weapon forms
  • The first international wushu competition routines including all weapon forms
  • The second international wushu competition routines including all weapon forms
  • The 3rd set of international wushu competition routines including all weapon forms

For details about wushu, please refer to Wikipedia at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wushu_(sport)




Internal Kung Fu

Tai chi (taiji), xingyiquan and baguanzhang curriculum currently offered


Description: IMG_4289.JPG Yang Style

For details about internal kung fu, please refer to Wikipedia page:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internal_martial_arts




Chen Style

For details about internal kung fu, please refer to Wikipedia page:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chen-style_t%27ai_chi_ch%27uan



Xingyiquan (Hsing-I)

For details about internal kung fu, please refer to Wikipedia page:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X%C3%ADngy%C3%ACqu%C3%A1n




Tai chi/Chi Kung (qigong) wellness classes

WWKF offers customized tai chi/qigong classes for physically challenged students or those who suffer from chronic pain. Call for details.

Tai chi is often described as "meditation in motion," but it might well be called "medication in motion." There is growing evidence that this mind-body practice, which originated in China as a martial art, has value in treating or preventing many health problems. And you can get started even if you aren't in top shape or the best of health.

In this low-impact, slow-motion exercise, you go without pausing through a series of motions named for animal actions — for example, "white crane spreads its wings" — or martial arts moves, such as "box both ears." As you move, you breathe deeply and naturally, focusing your attention — as in some kinds of meditation — on your bodily sensations. Tai chi differs from other types of exercise in several respects. The movements are usually circular and never forced, the muscles are relaxed rather than tensed, the joints are not fully extended or bent, and connective tissues are not stretched. Tai chi can be easily adapted for anyone, from the most fit to people confined to wheelchairs or recovering from surgery.

A tai chi class might include these parts:

Warm-up. Easy motions, such as shoulder circles, turning the head from side to side, or rocking back and forth, help you to loosen your muscles and joints and focus on your breath and body.

Instruction and practice of tai chi forms. Short forms — forms are sets of movements — may include a dozen or fewer movements; long forms may include hundreds. Different styles require smaller or larger movements. A short form with smaller, slower movements is usually recommended at the beginning, especially if you're older or not in good condition.

Qigong (or chi kung). Translated as "breath work" or "energy work," this consists of a few minutes of gentle breathing sometimes combined with movement. The idea is to help relax the mind and mobilize the body's energy.  Qigong may be practiced standing, sitting, or lying down.


Adult Sanda (Self Defense)

Sanda, Sanshou, Chinese boxing / Chinese kickboxing or an "unsanctioned fight" is a Chinese self-defense system and combat sport. Sanshou is a martial art which was originally developed by the Chinese military based upon the study and practices of traditional Kung fu and modern combat fighting techniques; it combines full-contact kickboxing, which include close range and rapid successive punches and kicks, with wrestling, takedowns, throws, sweeps, kick catches, and in some competitions, even elbow and knee strikes. Not seen as a style itself, rather it is considered as just one of the two components of Chinese martial arts training and is often taught alongside with taolu (forms) training.

The curriculum is composed of different traditional martial arts fighting styles from China, but mainly based on scientific efficiency, and Chinese martial arts applications including most aspects of combat including striking and grappling.

Youth Sanda (Light Contact Self Defense)

The curriculum is the same as described in Adult Sanda but with light contacts under control and restrictions so young students could learn the skills with minimal risks.